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Pruth Campaign Skirmish Action in 6mm using Pikeman’s Lament – Part 2: The painting and the basing

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In the previous blog entry (see here) I set out the forces and the miniatures I intended to use for this project.  I have just completed these units this week and hope to get a game with the Little One in the near future.  Same approach as always in trying to achieve reasonable results not individual master pieces.  The units I planned to do were as follows, based on some possible small encounters during the Pruth Campaign 1711.

Ottomans No Pts/ unit Total Pts Unit Size Total Models Baccus Pack
Veteran Shot

5

6

30

12

60

OTT02

Trotters

4

4

16

6

24

GNP05

Total

9

46

84

Russians No Pts/ unit Total Pts Unit Size Total Models Baccus Pack
Dragoons

4

4

16

6

24

WSS12

Forlorn Hope

3

6

18

6

18

WSS03

Raw Trotters

4

3

12

6

24

WSS08

Total

11

46

66

I am very happy with the result and I am tempted to make a small Swedish “force” from the same era (with some pikes).

Perhaps something like this.

Swedish No Pts/ unit Total Pts Unit Size Total Models Baccus Pack
Shot

5

4

20

12

60

GNS01 (Tricorne) or GNS02 (Karpus)

Pike

2

4

8

12

24

GNS03 (Tricorne) or GNS04 (Karpus)

Aggressive Elite Gallopers

3

6

18

6

18

GNS05 or GNS06

Total

9

46

102

Sorry trying to avoid drifting, back to the Pruth stuff.

Russians

For the Russians I decided to go for units with red as a common denominator and painted them as  based on units that took part in the campaign (based on a list from the draft of Nick Dorrell’s upcoming book – discussed in the previous blog, here).  All these are from the “new” Baccus WSS range – I had not yet painted these but I must say that they are a joy to paint.  I have so far used the old WSS range for my GNW stuff as I have a fair few of the ones lying around from previous purchases with hybric flavours.

On the subject of the Russians of this era I did notice a book currently on pre-order due out in November this year. The book is titled The Russian Army in the Great Northern War 1700-21 with the subtitle Uniforms, Organization, Materiel, Training and Combat Experience. I hope this will have some more information on uniform colours than what is currently available. Although I have to admit that I pre-ordered it based on the title, what is really interesting is the background of the author.  I let you read it yourself.

Boris Megorsky was born in Leningrad, USSR in 1978. He lives in St Petersburg, Russia with his beloved wife Olga and three-year-old son Vadim. He did his PhD in Political Science and works in Human Resources, but his true passion has always been military history. As a scholar, he specializes in the everyday life of the Russian Army, its uniforms and siege warfare of the Great Northern War period; he has written dozens of articles and theses on these subjects. His book about the siege of Narva in 1704 was published in Russia in 2016 and, as a re-enactor, he is a member and sergeant of the Preobrazhensky Life Guard Regiment, 1709 ( Russia’s leading re-enactment society of the early 1700s). His passion for miniatures makes him pay great attention to details both in research and in reconstructions, be it re-enactors’ kit or graphical illustration consultations. He has consulted on a number of films, museum and publishing projects, and has worked with miniature manufacturers and artists.   – From the Amazon Webpage

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Here is a link to it at Amazon (but there are probably other places where you can buy it too, like the book depository). Worth having on your radar, but a long way from being out.  Would  of course be useful for the Pruth campaign too. Back to the key thread again.

Permski Dragoon Regiment (Dragoons)

The Permski dragoon regiment were present in the 1711 campaign so I decided to make my dragoon units represent a detachment from this regiment.  They had white coats with red cuffs.  I have already painted some of these for the Lesnaya Battle but they are based on 60 by 30mm bases.  As these represents the Dragoon in the traditional role of being more mounted infantry than cavalry they have been based with unmounted figures but with a horse present on each base.  I have used the 1-2-3 system (shown in the Pikeman’s Lament rulebook), modified to fit the 6mm scale, and as discussed in this blog entry if you do not have the book at hand.

4 units of 6 dragoons, based with the 1-2-3 method (15mm, 20mm and 25mm bases)

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Repnin’s Grenadiers (Forlorn Hope)

I painted these to represent Repnin’s Grenadiers that had red coats with (speculative?) blue cuffs. Named after the Russian General, and eventually Field Marshal, Prince Anikita Ivanovich Repnin who commanded one of the Russian centre commands at Poltava in 1709 (you can read more about him here).  These were also based with the 1-2-3 system.

3 units of 6 Forlorn Hope, based with the 1-2-3 method (12mm, 15mm and 20mm bases).

Russian1

General Sheremetev’s Dragoon Squadron (Raw Trotters)

For these I wanted them to represent General Sheremetev’s Squadron, I painted them with red coats and white cuffs. Potentially these could be classified as non-raw (or even Veteran) assuming that the General’s squadron may be more potent than the standard dragoon unit.  Boris Sheremetev commanded the overall centre at Poltava in 1709 and led the main army in the Pruth Campaign (more about him here).

4 units of 6 trotters, based with the 1-2-3 method (15mm, 20mm and 25mm bases). 

Russian6.jpg

The Ottomans

I do not have a lot of information of who wore what for these units – so I did a quick decision to paint them based on a basic livery green (green ink on the clothing and then picking out some detail with Livery Green). Finally got to use this fine Colour!

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I would be very keen to get some comprehensive information on detailed organization and uniform guides from this conflict – but until then artistic freedom will do.  I you have any views or suggestions please do let me know through the contact option on the blog of find us on facebook and ask away.

Janissaries (Veteran Shot)

I painted these in a green coat with the traditional white headgear with some simple pink detail/  There is a little story about how models were developed by  Master 6mm painter Dr. Mike also known as Cranium (here).  He is the man who runs the SMS (Small Model Soldier)  painting clinics at various shows, teaching people how to paint “something so small”.  I developed most of the techniques I am using in painting 6mm from reading his entries on the old Baccus forum (I do not find these anymore) – my favourite is the use of Windsor & Newton Ink (Nut Brown) after the painting is done – the army painter quick shade equivalent for smaller scales (kind of!) . It really makes the models “look better than they are”, in my opinion. Try it for yourself – go nuts!

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5 units of 12 Veteran Shot, based with the 1-2-3 method (12mm, 15mm and 20mm bases).

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Sipahi (Trotters)

Again a green colour scheme with bronzed helmet. I painted the flags green with three crescents as I had seen this for an Ottoman unit many years ago at a wargames show and liked it.  Having done some research I am not 100% sure it is a valid flag for the Ottomans – but I like it so it stays until I have better alternative.  The bronze helmets also looks good and, like the pink and white on the Janissaries, show that these uniforms where not designed to blend into the countryside but to look stunning!

4 units of 6 trotters, based with the 1-2-3 method (15mm, 20mm and 25mm bases)

ottoman1.jpg

Hope that was of some interest, another read of the rules and we have to hit the table with these. Not the same splendor as individual 28mm bases for skirmish, but it works for me. The fact that I have produced two opposing forces of almost twice the recommended starting size in a week of hobby-time is perhaps the biggest advantage.

I did a similar project for the Men Who Would be Kings rules that you can find information about (here, here and here).

Next week I will be showing some progress on the main project (a proper large battle). As the package with models came through from Marching in Colour last week (see here) and I have started slowly getting my act together again this week (afterthought – as if it ever was there!).

I have decided to give the Mutant 1984 project a break over the Summer – I did paint the two little structures/buildings I did a few weeks back (here) and showed them on the Facebook page. For completeness I include them here as well. I think we are getting closer to having the terrain we need for a proper game with these rules.   I am excited to start a campaign with some Pyri Commonwealth Soldiers  – The recollections of rifleman Crocodylus. However there is something rather therapeutic in doing some terrain so perhaps there will be some pieces done in the background of everything  else.

some more progresssome progress

The picture below shows the good Rifleman Crocodylus  himself next to to one of the 6mm Dragoon bases above and a BIC pen for size comparison, as I occasionally get questions about this through the site. The Rifleman is a converted Warlord 95th rifle model (28mm scale) with a head from a crooked dice model.

croccomp

/ Take care

 

Kalisz 1706 at Salute 2017 – Part 4 ready for the Show and some Scrap for Scrappers

packing 1.jpg

This is the 50th blog post since we started last year following Salute 2016 (here is a link to the very first post) – no big parties lined up or memorial statues being carved but there is a certain level of satisfaction involved – I am celebrating the occasion rolling a few ones and having a few crafty beers.

We spent last week in Southern France visiting some friends with the compulsory sampling of the local produce to the small hours.  The Little One practiced his camouflage skills and apart from the bright NERF rifle it was difficult to spot him and his friend in the undergrowth.

camo boys 1.jpg

On the Wargames front there is not much new – all the Stuff for Salute is packed.

We have told you where to look for us at Salute in the last blog entry (see here) and here is the general blur about it (see here) – hope we will see you there!

I had to rearrange a little bit so the Russians got out of their box anyway in their full glory.  Here are a few shots showing 24 of the total 32 bases that will be present on the day.

russ1russ2

And finally and most important to create some dimension on an otherwise relatively flat battlefield – the trees.

packing 2packing 3

Below is a link to an PDF file with the details of the bases for the Battle and game statistics for both Polemos GNW as well as The Twilight of the Sun King.  See the notes below on regards on what each bases represents in the Polemos rules which should make it relatively easy to translate the overall list to whatever rules you are using.  Note that this list is slightly different to what I have presented in previous postings as some corrections in the list have been made.

I think we will run the Demo game using the Twilight of the Sun King rules on the day, see more here.

Link to Kalisz Bases Polemos GNW and TOTSK

With regards to the Polemos Basing the following act as guidelines.  Note that the leader/commander bases are markers indicating where the leaders are located on the field of battle and not active combat units.  I tend to base them with 1 to 3 models on the front row representing quality (1 – Poor, 2 – Average and 3 – Excellent) and models on the back row representing Tempo points (used in the Polemos rules).

The extract below is from the Polemos GNW Rulebook (Page 5).

“The actual ratio of figures to real men will vary depending on how many figures you put on a base.  A base represents the following: 
 
 A base of infantry, except skirmishing infantry, represents between 400 and 600 men.  They can be a single large battalion, a pair of smaller ones or a group of subunits up to this approximate strength.  
 
 A base of cavalry, dismounted dragoons and skirmishing infantry represents two to three squadrons or similar groups, representing 200 to 300 men.  A cavalry base is assumed to include wide intervals between squadrons, allowing friendly cavalry bases to pass through each other.  
 
 An artillery base represents four to eight guns.  The number of guns that a base represents varies depending on the size of the real guns.  Four heavy guns will be represented by one base.  While eight light guns will also be represented by one base.

And there was another thing…

A delivery of some Corrugated Sheet Metal

I get a fair few deliveries from Amazon (google it if you are not familiar with them) and I noted that their packaging have a very nice and tight corrugation.  I have seen this being used in the past to simulate corrugated sheets but had not tried it myself.  I wanted to give it a try as I want to expand on the terrain I have for using with the Scrappers Mutant 1984 project I am working on (See more about it here).

IMG_2389

Armed with a sharp knife I set slowly cut away the cover sheet on one side (I hope it is bleeding obvious but be careful when you use a knife).

IMG_2387

After a few minutes I had plenty of uncovered sheets (I only cut them on one side).

IMG_2390

After this I cut out small 40 by 20 mm pieces.

IMG_2392

I got a nice pile of them.

IMG_2391

I then built a simple test structure using some coffee stirrers (like the ones you get at Starbucks), matches, and my corrugated sheets. Using superglue and PVA to stick the things together,  The two colorful pieces on top are made from some Kinder Egg rubbish the Small One had lying around – I and the Little One speculated that these could be part of some semi-portable wind based energy system. They had some interesting detail that will look good when drybrushed later.

building.jpg

I gave it a spray with a grey primer and I think this will paint up reasonably well (here with some unfinished miniatures to understand scale) and I think it looks ok with the 28mm figures.

Next week the Scrappers rules should arrive (from Amazon) with some new building materials! (although the little structure hardly caused a dent in the pile).

/ All revved up and certainly a place to go to…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Featured

Kalisz 1706 at Salute 2017 – Battleboards and the Swedes, Tanks and Mutant 1984

Long weekend of Rugby with the annual ‘long distance’ tournament with the Little Ones – this year held in Bournemouth.  The Little One had a blast and made us proud as always. A weekend in Dorset is never wrong and we had to sneak into the Tank Museum in Bovington for a quick look.  We did not do much hobby related this week, so in no particular order a few shots of the (a) Kalisz Battle boards for Salute and some Swedes, (b) some pictures from the Tank Museum and (c) some progress on the Mutant 1984 project.

Kalisz Battle boards and Swedes

I got the 2″ by 2″ boards out this weekend. They have been in the attic since the table was laid out at Joy of Six in 2014 – some warping evident and a damaged bridge but not beyond unacceptable and the bridge can be fixed.  Now I have to find the buildings for the two villages and Kalisz itself – I wonder where they are?

I also got the Swedish (few) elements out and realized that I need to do some flags for the infantry – it seems like we ran the game last time without infantry standards (Perhaps that was the reason the Swedes lost?).

 

Bovington Tank Museum

We went to the Tank Museum in Saumur last year and loved it (see blog entry here), the one in Bovington is equally impressive if not better.  From the perspective of telling history and putting the tank into a perspective the Bovington experience is brilliant.  Here are a few pictures of what we found particularly interesting.  Go there if you can (link here).  T(h)ank you Bovington – we had a great day!

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Mutant 1984 – Ulvriket Patrol – Work in Progress

Work in progress on the next unit for this little diversion. This is the Ulvriket Patrol with some further detailing and basing remaining but a small step forward.  As discussed in the previous blog entry (see here) basically WW2 Americans in Greatcoat and a WW2 German Officer. I used a Russian WW2 Vehicle Green for the Coats and Khaki for details and helmets. Looks familiar but odd.

Ulvriket1
The infantry unit based on Artizan Design Americans and a German Officer.

 

Then the mutated element with conversions (I will give further details for what I used in the blog update for these when they are finalized).

ulvriket3.jpg
The Mutants – A gorilla (Crooked Dice head swap), the wingman (do not remember where the wings are from), the pig (again from Crooked Dice) and the Goat (head and leg swap  with a Moonraker miniature).

 

/ All the very best

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Zulus and taking the rusty cars for a spin

zulu5

I think I promised to show off the Kalisz stuff for Salute this week, but the weekend just disappeared and I have to get on with it next week instead.  However I did finish off some Zulus for my little diversion into doing some Colonial 6mm skirmish (see last blog entry here).  I also ordered some Boers from Baccus (these ones) as I fancied doing a few units of these as well.  I have also rummaged through my old boxes and found some Gatling guns and some other stuff to do when I have time.

zulu.jpg

I organized these on bases with different number of figures to simplify the management of moving many figures and still being able to remove casualties. Each unit of tribal infantry is 16 figures strong – so I based them in on bases with 4-4-3-2-2-1 figures.  I intend to make another 8 units to get enough Zulus to get the balance right vs the British.

zulu2.jpg

zulu3

zulu4.jpg

Next week I hope to have a go trying out the rules (The Men who Would be Kings) and using these figures – they (the rules) seem pretty straightforward and fun having read them through twice.

I did finish of the car wrecks we prepared last week for the Terminator games we play and gave them a rather tired and rusty look to blend into the ruins we already have.

car.jpg

The Little One set them up with some of the Terminator miniatures and we felt they passed the test!

car2.jpg

Having taken out the stuff we thought we might as well have a game.  We did not plan the Scenario too much, instead we had a “high level” situation where a platoon sized resistance force (Lt, 2 NCOs, 20 fighters) , supported by a Mortar team and two rocket launched equipped fighters, encountered a unit of 15 Endo Skeletons (1 Lvl 2 leader, 12 Normal ones, 1 with two Plasma Rifle and the star of the evening a skeleton with a flamer). Basically a “Beat the crap out of each other situation”. We used a few of the ruined building we had prepared earlier as well as the car wrecks.

It was a tight game and initially the resistance side managed to take out a fair few of the terminators before they fighting got close and the machines started dominating.  Below are a few of the before and after the flamer attack pictures.

And this was after I (yes I was the resistance and yes I lost yet again!) had almost knocked out the flamer unit with a single shot but did not manage to finish it off.

termgame11
Temporary harmless flamer unit but the resistance failed to take full advantage of the situation. Instead it was allowed to continue the carnage until a sticky bomb took it (and the user) down.

 

We both enjoy playing this game, I find it challenging for the resistance to be successful and things can turn nasty very quickly.  I still remember almost shitting myself in the cinema when I watched the beginning of Terminator 2 when the machine crushes the human skull with its feet (see the clip here if you do not remember – 42 seconds in).  As for the rules they really capture the feeling for the setting and work ok as they are.  I may tweak the activation slightly so that it is not certain that all units are activated in turn to add to the level of friction. Currently you activate between 0 to 2 figures (but can be modified with leaders) per pulse (part of a turn) but everyone activates.

Here are a few more pictures, have a good week.

 

Towards Moscow Trilogy (TMT) – Part 4, Bon Voyage Dr. Bardaux, FIW Flags and Swedish Infantry finally done for Lesnaya

True to my words, at least this time, last weeks effort were focused on the main project. 17 bases of infantry inked, highlighted, based and flagged this weekend from the base painted pile. More on this below. It is nice to do some 6mm again.

infantry.jpg

I am really happy I managed to get that famous finger out of that dreadful place and get these done.  I have had too many diversions lately on the hobby front with the Terminator stuff (did I say Terminators, Sorry!) and other pleasant non-priority things. On the personal front I had to go to France for a funeral earlier in the week.  This was for a very special Lady who touched many hearts and inspired me in so many ways over the years, she truly was a manifestation of her own favourite poem “A thing of beauty, is joy forever” (link to it here). Hats off for you Dr. Bardaux!

I also got those flags I talked about to use for the French and Indian War games, one Nouvelle France flag and also the Kings Colours (looks very good, me thinks!).

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Swedish Infantry at Lesnaya

The following are the infantry made for the Lesnaya Battle (with some facts from the eminent book by Lars-Erik Höglund and Åke-Sallnäs, The Great Northern War 1700-1721 – Colours and Uniforms).

Estlänskt Infanteriregemente (de la Gardie), 2 battalions.

This was an enlisted regiment and raised in 1700 by the Governor General of Estland A.J. de la Gardie. After the Lesnaya Battle the regiment, due to heavy losses, where incorporated into the Västerbotten Regiment and fought in the Poltava Battle in 1709. They did not carry pikes and both battalions of the regiment were present at the Lesnaya Battle. The regiment, together with a battalion of the  Närke-Värmland Tremänning regemente, formed the rearguard that were first attacked by the Russians.

de-la-gardie

Närke-Värmland Tremänning regemente, 1 battalion.

This was a temporary regiment that was raised in 1700 and had been reduced to one battalion in 1705.  Was, due to losses, incorporated into the Livgardet (Lifeguard) after the Lesnaya battle. As mentioned above, part of the rearguard, that first had contact with the enemy at the battle.

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Hälsinge Regemente, 2 battalions.

This was a regular indelta (provincial) regiment and had its origins from the 16th century. The survivors from the battle was transferred to the Dalregementet.  The regiment was one of three regiments that first came to aid to the rearguard that was being attacked by the Russians.

helsinge.jpg

Upplands, Västmanlands och Dalarnas Tremänning regemente, 2 battalions.

Another temporary regiment raised in 1700 and the survivors after the Lesnaya Battle was incorporated into the Livgardet.  Was part of the early support force sent to help the rearguard.

uppland.jpg

Åbo Läns regemente, 1 battalion.

A regular provincial (finnish) regiment created in the 17th century. It had one battalion with the Lewenhaupt army (the other retained for fortress duty). As for the two regiments above part of the early support force.

abo-lans

Småland Tremänning regemente, 2 battalions.

Yet another temporary regiment that was raised in 1700 and you guessed it, due to losses, incorporated into the Livgardet (Lifeguard) after the Lesnaya battle. This like the other 3 regiments below was at Lesnaya during the Battle.

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Åbo, Björneborg och Nylands Tremänning regemente, 2 battalions.

Temporary regiment that was raised in 1700 and it is not perfectly clear whether one or two battalions joined Lewenhaupts Army. Survivors after the battle were incorporated into the Västmanland regimente.

abo-bjorne

Öselska Lantmilisbataljon, 1 battalion.

This was a militia force raised in 1702 and took heavy losses at Lesnaya and after this was incorporated into the Västerbotten regimente. They did not carry pikes.

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Österbotten regemente, 1 battalion.

A regular provincial (finnish) regiment created in the 17th century. It had one battalion with the Lewenhaupt army (the other retained for fortress duty). Survivors from the Lesnaya Battle were put into the Närke-Värmland regimente.

osterbottens regemente.jpg

Nylands regemente, 1 battalion.

A regular provincial regiment created in the 17th century. It had one battalion with the Lewenhaupt army (the other retained for fortress duty). Was sent to enforce the troops at Lesnaya.  Survivors after the Battle were placed in the Västmanland Regemente.

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Björneborgs regemente, 2 battalions.

A regular provincial (finnish) regiment created in the 17th century. As for the Nylands regmente it came as an enforcement to the troops at Lesnaya. Survivors after the Battle were placed in the Västmanland Regemente.

bjorneborgs.jpg

/ See you next week

 

 

These ruins do not look very good Papa, do they?

If you have followed this blog you know that I have been doing some Terminator stuff to get the Little One a little bit more involved in the non-electronic side of the gaming hobby.  Initially I wanted to get the box, paint a set and get a few games of it before going on to more things.  Last week I finished painting another starter set worth of miniatures as well as 7 specialized machines and a handful of resistance specials (this includes the ones with the headswaps from Badsquiddo Games (link here) I showed in the blog last time, see link here). Basic quick paintjobs based on the little ones preferred uniform colours and ready for the table!

I also converted an old German Paratrooper set to a resistance mortar (as these are no longer for sale) and did a headswap from a celtic dog handler to avoid the German look, I then used the three dogs in the set to do some sniffer dogs for the game (Again, these are also sold out. These are dogs that can identify a robot infiltrator and consequently the model can be attacked – in game terms the model can sneak around freely until (1) a dog handler challenges it or (2) it attacks).  I felt the game needed some sniffer dogs as well as some mortar support for the resistance.

This was based on the following two packs from Warlord Games (link here).

Obviously the ones originally produced for the game look much better (but this solution works for us!). If they are offered again the resistance of course will be futile, but until then here we are.

The game comes with some cardboard terrain, including some flat ruins as shown in the picture below.  On inspection and reflection the little one looked at me and said “These ruins do not look very good Papa, do they?”. I agreed that they didn’t but instead said, “They are ok, we just use our imagination!”, thinking that I had other things to do, like this years installment of the Towards Moscow Project that needs to be ready for the Joy of Six or, even closer, the Kalisz Battle for Salute.  I seemed to have wiggled myself of the hook!

 

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Nothing wrong with these but I find mixing 3D (like minatures) with 2D is, let us be honest, far from appealing in any sense.

 

Later that evening when the Little One was visiting Neverland I packed up the stuff from the game we had played and looked at those ruined tiles again – Nice artwork aside, they did not look that good.  I went on ebay and ordered some mdf ruins (yes I could have used 6mm floor insulation foam and cut my own shapes) but I this stage I thought I just get some mdf ruins and paint them black and drybrush them in grey – job done!

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This is what I got! I used about half of the stuff I got in doing the four ruins presented later. I, as always unless I mention it, have no affiliation with this seller and can really recommend these. It is very good value for money!

 

After a few days they arrived but when I had assembled them I got second thoughts about how to finish them and instead of just painting them after assembly I pimped them up a little bit before priming. I cut out some bases from some vinyl floor tiling material I had lying around (left over from the Saga table I did last year) and glued the ruins on top (I used hard as nails adhesive).  I then applied some PVA glue on the ground and added sand. For the walls I applied a thin, but rough coat of modelling paste on the walls. I took some stones from the garden, cut some cocktail sticks and matches into small pieces, cut up some pieces of plastic into small squares and mixed it all with PVA glue and applied it here and there. I also added some small stones on the edges of collapsed flooring and wall sections. In addition I added thin sand on top of each wall (using PVA) that was not broken (to take away the evenness of the laser cut). I also had a few crates etc I added here and there.  I ended up with this!

Once it was properly dry (With PVA it takes a while) I primed it in Black Gesso, painted the ground brown, then drybrushed it with a light brown. For the walls and rubble I just dry brushed it with a dark grey followed by a light grey. I added a few dry tufts.

I got thumbs up from the Little One and they have already been put to use in a skirmish today.  I am just waiting for him to tell me “This game mat does not look very good, does it!” (It is made of paper and from the basic box!)..

Here are some shots from the opening of that game.

So until I get the mat request, I will now fully dedicate my modelling hours to the Towards Moscow Project.  Here is the current progress, mostly thanks to Chris at Marching in Colours! A few more models to be inked, detailed, flagged-up and based.

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I also got some table flags that I will use when  I do Winter War gaming. I thought it added a nice touch, although I did surprise a friend of mine when he came over and noticed the Soviet flag. However, the explanation about using it when I played with toy soldiers seemed to make him think I was more weird than what the flag itself implied. I have also ordered a King’s Colours flag (or Great Union flag, that was used by England and Scotland up to 1801) and a Nouvelle France flag for my French Indian War Battles, and a Swedish and Tsarist Russian Flag for the Towards Moscow Battles.

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/ All the best, and although “I will be back!”, there will be no terminators next time, I promise.

 

Year End and Talvisota / Winter War Chain of Command – Part 2 The Finnish Platoon

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A Finnish Lieutenant (Luutnantii) and a Captain (Kapteeni) inspecting a Red Army Light Machine Gun, the  7.62mm Degtyarev M-27. The picture was taken on New Years eve 1939 and is from SA-kuva (Finnish Armed Forces Photographs) and you can find their webpage here.

 

Year End

This is a continuation from the last post.. but first some reflections – it is that kind of time of the year after all…

I started this blog to help to promote the Saga game I ran with the help of Neil Shuck et al at the Joy of Six 2016 show about 35 weeks ago (as this is the 35th blog update and I think we have done one per week!).  I continued running the blog for three reasons – (i) I actually enjoy doing the blog posting and it does not take very long to do, (ii) it helps me being more productive, and  finally (iii) it seems that people do end up on this blog and the average visit ends up in more than one entry being viewed.

The blog has been running for about 8 months and I have mainly covered 6mm projects and it is likely that it will be like that moving forward.  I think the scale  is very rewarding when you have limited time to work on each project and want to create a visually stunning representation of a big battle.  I have also tried to show this year that you can take 6mm to ‘another level’ in my Saga and Sharp Practice examples. I will be doing some more 15mm WW2 era stuff and I may even do some Halo Stuff that I have been eluding to for the last few months – but it depends on how hard pressure the little One will apply.

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Sharp Practice in 6mm

 

With the Saga project I wanted to show that for some games we can just replace the individual based with a base with a few 6mm soldiers and still run a very pleasing game. For the Sharp Practice stuff I have just scaled down everything I am playing with half inches instead of full inches. We have now done a few games and it plays really well – and set-up time is very quick.  But the main reason for doing them was that they are good and solid games and I have enjoyed playing them. The drop in scale did not affect playability.

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Saga in 6mm at Joy of Six 2016

 

As for the main activities for next year it will be the preparation of the first installment of the Great Northern War Towards Moscow Trilogy – Lesnaya 1708 – at Joy of Six in July.  It seems like ages away but I know that it will come thundering like a Swedish Gå-På attack but I think my progress so far is promising – failure, however, is not an option. There is also the dusting off to be done for the Kalisz 1706 game at Salute in April, but all is already more or less done so I am not worried about that.  We will be running these games using The Twilight of the Sun King (see a little write-up here) or the Polemos GNW Rules (see here). In the background I am slowly getting on with the supply column and will show these in a future blog.

I bought a copy of the Dawns & Departures campaign supplement for Sharp Practice 2 and would like to use my 6mm FIW figures to do a campaign.  This is an excellent supplement and I suggest you buy it even if do not use Sharp Practice (you can find further information here), I think it would be useful for anyone considering running a wargames campaign.  I will also enjoy my finished Finnish and Soviet platoon and play some Chain of Command – I noted the useful stuff for the Winter War in the Lardies Winter Special 2016 I just bought (again from the Lardies site, here).

I will also do some forces for IABSM (see here) in 6mm  and maybe some more Chain of Command Continuation war stuff in 15mm.  I also have a few more lead mountain leftovers, that on reflection may trigger renewed interest – there is still some veins of  good lead to be found. I may also put up some action shots as well next year, because we do play some stuff not just paint the buggers.

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Got myself some good reading material on the Continuation war in Swedish over Christmas. The first book discusses strategy used by both sides and the second about fighting in the East Karelia. Both are out of print.

 

With regards to playing games, in addition to those mentioned above, I will try out the new Basic Impetus 2 rules (see here)  and Sword and Spear (see here) using my 6mm Saga War Bands.

I think this far exceeds what I will end up doing, so as an ambition this is absolutely brilliant!

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It is about having fun with your toy soldiers at the end of day. And so we have… thanks for having stopped by.

Please leave some feedback if you want, sign-up here or like the page on face book – and you will be updated on new postings!

For more on Saga in 6mm, click here.

For more on Sharp Practice in 6mm, click here.

For more on the Toward Moscow Trilogy Project, click here.

Now back to the Chain of Command Finnish Platoon for the Winter War (if you have not read the first part you should perhaps go back to the last blog, you can find it here).

The Finnish Winter War Platoon for Chain of Command

You can find the army list here from Too Fat Lardies (The Platoon Force Rating is +0 for regular and +7 for elite, 5 command dice for regular and 6 for Elite).

NOTE: As before the bases are in desperate need of some modelling snow flock – not done yet.

Platoon Headquarters – Vänrikki Ruotsalainen (Senior Leader with Pistol), Kersantti Hautamäki (Senior Leader with Rifle).

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Platoon HQ

 

Section One – Alikersantti Linna (Junior Leader with Rifle), Rifle team (four riflemen) and SMG Team (one man with SMG and four riflemen).

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First Section

 

Section Two – Alikersantti Paasilinia (Junior Leader with Rifle), Rifle team (three riflemen) and LMG Team (LMG with two crew one rifleman).  Painted skulls on two of the helmets based on some pictures and original helmets from the war.

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Second Section

 

Section Three – Alikersantti Torvalds (Junior Leader with Rifle), Rifle team (three riflemen) and LMG Team (LMG with two crew one rifleman).

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Third Section

 

Section Four – Alikersantti Aalto (Junior Leader with Rifle), Rifle team (four riflemen) and SMG Team (one man with SMG and four riflemen).

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Fourth Section

 

Support Options

List 1

Medical Orderly – a artillery crew member with a box painted with a cross and as by magic a medical orderly.

 

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Medical Orderly (yes, I can see the metal base too!)

 

Engineering team – mine clearance, wire cutting, etc. This is a mix of standard and converted models.

 

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Engineering Team

 

SMGs to allocate – These are from Legion East, Resistant Rooster and Battlefront.

 

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SMG Troopers

 

For the Satchel charge, Molotov cocktail and Captured SVT-38 I make a note before play (runners are not represented on the table). Terrainy objects once I get some pictures from an actual game.

List 2

I do not have a model carrying a Russian LMG (Captured). May have to do one.

AT Defense Team – these are from left to right – converted Legion East Grenade Thrower with a log, Battlefront log carrier with Peter Pig Head, Battlefront Original, Resistant Rooster Molotov Cocktail man, ditto from Battlefront and finally a grenade thrower from Legion East. A Motley Crew and mix. However they are more than ready to mess with your tank.

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List 3

Anti-tank Gun, MMG and AT Rifle Team, 5 men (three with rifles) from Battlefront (not sure where the AT Gun is from though).

 

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AT Gun

 

 

 

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MMG Teams

 

 

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AT Rifle Team Advancing

 

 

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AT Rifle Team Shooting

 

 

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AT Rifle Team Shooting

 

Sniper Team – Legion East helper and a Peter Pig German Sniper.

 

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Sniper Team

 

List 4

I am currently working on the Bofors Gun and the captured Soviet Gun – I got these from Battlefront (the 37mm beautifully designed Bofors Gun can be found in the Polish range, just get some Finnish Crew).

List 5

Forward observers – two German models from Peter Pig.

 

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Forward Observers

 

Next I need to figure out what playing surface to use, but that is for another time.

/ That was all for this year, Happy New 2017