Forces at the Battle of Lund 1676 (Scanian War) Part 1 – Danish Cavalry

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Did a little bit of painting of cavalry for the Scanian War project using Baccus 6mm new Sun King range just before our holidays, but forgot to log them here. I am really pleased with these models and there were a joy to point.

Starting with 3 of the regiments in the Right Wing – Commanded by Lt. General Frederik von Arensdorf.

The normal Polemos/Twilight of the Sun King basing I have used for my Great Northern War stuff has been 9 cavalry on a 60 by 30mm base, representing about 2 squadrons worth of riders.

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For this project I decided to do one smaller bases 30 by 30mm for each squadron with 6 for Dragoons and 8 for regular cavalry – reading the accounts I want to enable the squadrons to have the ability to be an independent unit just like the battalion.

Colonel Örtzen Dragoner – 3 squadrons (Col. Örtzen)

Livregiment Ryttere (enlisted) – 3 squadrons (Col. Meerheim)

Hestgarden (The Horseguard) – 2 squadrons (Col. Plessen)

I have a fair few more to paint in the next few months! Excellent little models from Baccus!

But next time to base the infantry I painted on holiday (see more here).

/ Hope that was of some interest.

 

 

 

 

 

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10 thoughts on “Forces at the Battle of Lund 1676 (Scanian War) Part 1 – Danish Cavalry

  1. Chris Johnson

    Can you recommend a good book on the Scanian War? It seems to be even less well known than the Great Northern War!

    Best regards,

    Chris Johnson

    Liked by 2 people

    1. This one it is called CHARLES XI’S WAR. THE SCANIAN WAR BETWEEN SWEDEN AND DENMARK, 1675-1679 by von Essen https://www.helion.co.uk/charles-xi-war.html It is excellent
      from the blur “The book describes and analyses the Scanian War, which was fought from 1675 to 1679 between, on one side, primarily Brandenburg and Denmark–Norway and, on the other, Sweden. The war was mainly fought in Scania, the former Danish lands along the border with Sweden, and in northern Germany. The Danish objective was to retrieve Scania which, a generation earlier, had been captured by Sweden and ceded by Denmark. However, the Danish invasion of Scania was defeated by the young Swedish King Charles XI. Although the Danish fleet was victorious at sea, and an alliance headed by Brandenburg defeated the Swedes in Germany, the subsequent peace negotiations resulted in no major territorial changes. Danish partisans continued guerrilla operations in Scania for years, yet the former Danish territories remained in Swedish hands. The Scanian War was bloody, even by contemporary standards, and from a military point of view, quite inconclusive. Yet, Sweden’s experiences in the Scanian War laid the foundation for the first substantial reform of the Swedish army since the Thirty Years’ War. Based on what he had learnt, King Charles XI restructured the Swedish army and established a comprehensive military system that enabled Sweden to repeatedly mobilise trained armies during the even more devastating Great Northern War (1700-1721) which followed a generation later. Moreover, several recent archaeological excavations have increased our knowledge of the Scanian War, as well as the conditions of late seventeenth-century battles. The book describes the war and its results, and summarises the archaeological findings. “

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Pingback: Forces at the Battle of Lund 1676 (Scanian War) Part 2 – Danish Cavalry – Roll a One

  3. Pingback: Forces at the Battle of Lund 1676 (Scanian War) Part 3 – Danish Cavalry and a note on Winter Basing – Roll a One

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