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Swedish Infantry Battalion for O Group (1943M Organisation) – Part 1

Well it arrived a few weeks ago – the new rule set from Two Fat Lardies (well actually Reisswitz Press) and this morning I had a read through and watched some of the videos available on the internet (Look for . It seems really interesting – new in terms of scale and some of the mechanics but familiar in terms of some elements of the Lardies rule sets I have come to like. But more about that when I have actually played the game and know what I am talking about.

Here are a few good starting points if you want to know more before you buy or getting up to speed once you got the rules.

My current WW2 collection consist of a large number of different platoons in 15mm (varying between 1 and 2 per theatre and period), including Finnish and Soviets (Winter War and Continuation War), German (Early, Mid and Late), British (early war), French (early war), Greek (early war), Italian (early war) and of course two Swedish Platoons.

Well, it took me about two minutes to decide to make this as a Sweden 1943 project and in 15mm, as I already have all the tanks, etc I would need and in essence would only need to do some more infantry on bigger bases (than the individually based I have for my platoon) which is something as was planning to do upscaling the toys to be in used for IABSM (the Company Level game by Too Fat Lardies).

Battalion Command awaiting the outcome of the Battalion O Group Dice roll – “You said how many 6s?”

I thought I share this as an example on how you could take a rule set and its army lists as a basis for developing your own for nations or theatre specific situations that are not covered by a set of base rules and also in this this case very unlikely to show up in future supplements. If you are doing a ‘What-if project’ for a German invasion of Sweden in 1943, you are probably on your own. But to me this is a lot of fun in its own right. It would be interesting to see a Finnish Continuation War Organisation at some point too.

No obstacle is too difficult for the Swedish Infantry!

The Swedish Infantry Regiment

The Swedish infantry regiment in line with the 1943M organisation consisted of the following high level elements (from April 1943).

  • Regimental HQ
  • MG Company (consisting of 3 No. MG platoons, with 2 sections of two MGs (normally the m/36))
  • Specialist company – heavy weapons company (AT Platoon with 6 No. Bofors m/AT guns). AAMG Platoon with 4 No. AAMG on Tripods, Pioneer Platoon (w. 5 flamethrowers), Heavy Mortar Platoon, 3 120mm m/41 mortars with FO, AA Gun Platoon, 4 No. 20mm Bofors m/40, on Tripod
  • 1st Battalion – more detail on the battalion below, but basically, HQ, 1 No. Jager Platoon, 3 No. Rifle Company and 1 No. Heavy Company.
  • 2nd Battalion – as above
  • 3rd Battaltion – as above
LMG Group doing its Job

An Infantry battalion

The infantry battalion, which will form the basis of the units you will have on the table consisted of.

  • Battalion HQ
  • 1 No. Jager Platoon – consisting of Platoon HQ and 3 sections
  • 3 No. Rifle Company (Skyttekompani), each with
    • Company HQ
    • 4 No. Platoons, each with
      • Platoon HQ
      • 4 Rifle Sections
      • Specialist Section – 1 No. AT Rifle and 1 No. 47mm Mortar
    • Weapons Platoon
      • MG Section – 2 No. MGs (m/36 or m/42)
      • Mortar Section – 1 No. 80mm m/29 Mortar
  • 1 No. Heavy Company (Tunga Kompaniet)
    • Company HQ
    • Mortar Platoon
      • 2 No. Sections of 2 No. 80mm m/29 Mortars
    • AA/AT Platoon
      • AA/AT Platoon with 4 No. Bofors m/40 Guns (Tripods)
    • MG Platoon (Kulsprutekompani)
      • MG Section – 2 No. m/36 MG

So how do we translate this into the O Group Framework, well studying how for example a typical German Infantry Battalion has been structured I have come up with a first framework enough to get some miniatures done. I will flesh this out with stats and costs later but I think this is a good start. Note that the There are no Artillery support at Regimental level, the extra punch is provided by the high number of mortars, including the 120mm Mortars. I believe this would have been effective and possibly used with the same devastating effect as the Finns used theirs. I need to do further research on the Divisional support list as currently I have limited information on the organisation and operations above regimental level, but this will get me started.

The Start of a List for the O Group Infantry Battalion List for the Swedish Infantry Battalion

So, if you do have some further information or ideas, please do a comment for this post or use the contact form on the blog.

Commanders at Company Level and above were mounted

I am going to get myself some Battlefront Italians for this project right now.

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/ Hope that is of some interest.

Sources

  • Pictures above are from Krigsarkivet (Military Archives of Sweden, link here) and I have borrowed them from the eminent page Tornsvalan about Sweden during the war years, link here.
  • ‘O’ Group – Wargames Rules for Battalion Size Actions in World War II (2021), by David C.R. Brown, Reisswitz Press. Link here.
  • An Introduction to The Royal Swedish Army in WWII – really useful resource link here. I used their listing of the M1943 as a basis for the presentation above.
  • Infanterireglemente (InfR) – Regemente I (InfR I) – 1945 – This shows the M1943 organisation and details some of the aspects that are not covered in the link above. Difficult to get hold off but occassionally some of the regulations do show up on https://www.bokborsen.se/.

Neo Men for Mutant 1984, or an excuse to get some Ork (Cow)boys on the table

In the Swedish gaming magazine Sinkadus no 11 (1988) a new potential player character option was presented for the Mutant Post-apocalyptic RPG, the Neo Man (Note: technically for the Mutant 2 iteration from 1986 – the one that added the characteristics of Perception and Education, introduced a segment based combat system, similar to Runequest’s strike ranks but continuous, introduced hit locations and a much more sophisticated skill system), the Neo Men.

The Neo Men were originally the product of biologically manipulating humans to become bigger and stronger to become an asset of the military as a criminal punishment, during the 21st century. The manipulation also affected their personalities and intelligence significantly in a detrimental sense. Following the catastrophe a lot of them survived the harsh reality and due to their resilience and created societies.

Extract from the Article on Neo Men – Sinkadus no 11 (1988).

The Neo Men, through natural selection, tends to be a little bit smarter than orginally but still much lower than the other types (2D6+2 compared to 2D6+6 for mutants and 2D6+8 for mutans) , but their societies has long ago been eroded due to the rise of the human and mutant societies. They tend to form part of the under class when they live in “normal” society. In a way they could be seen as the equivalent of the Neanderthals in our world and perhaps as Orcs in other worlds (but perhaps more timid).

During lock-down I bought a set of Cowboy Orcs (why not!) and I thought this could represent a gang of Neo Men, perhaps of the smarter type! I also wanted to make their skin pink and reddish, a little bit like muscles on one of those educational posters (because it used to scare the s**t of me when I was little). This is a little bit different than the more greyish looks proposed in the original article.

I bought them on ebay from Miniature Men, seller is called miniaturemen07. I might have bought a few more… but that is for another time.

Anyway, here they are…. (they were originally seven, but I seem to have lost one).

They are nice and bulky compared to normal sized 28mm, but then the Siz of a Neo Man is 2D6+20 compared to the normal 2D6+6!.

/ Hope that was of some interest…

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Davidsson and Goliath – Dalarna 1943

During the hostilities in northern Dalarna in 1943 the Germans used remote control mines (known as the Goliath) in trying to break through the fortifications of the Swedish border defences. Hauptman Pillistin of the Pioneer Company deployed a number of them during the fighting in Särna. The Hero of Skans 211 (the name of the fortification system at Särna) Corporal Davidsson managed to demobilise three of them using his Scoped Rifle and some pretty accurate shooting. This caused a significant delay to the offensive that bought necessary time at the early stages of the offensive to ready the Swedish defences at the inner lines.

Ok, it is my 1943 what-if again and one of the scenarios I am working on. The idea with the eventual set of scenarios is to provide a book with some interesting scenarios ranging from defending fortified positions, creating bridge heads positions, assaulting over water, and forest fighting. It will be set in Sweden but you could equally replace the Swedes with Polish during 1939 or the Finns (and the German with the Soviets) during the 1944 Summer offensive, etc. Interested in presenting We shall see how it goes.

The defensive system at Särna was built following the invasion of Norway in 1940, it can be see in the video below (the audio is in Swedish but the pictures could be of some interest) as it looks today.

Now what is this Goliath thing, well it is a tracked mine (German: Leichter Ladungsträger Goliath, “Goliath Light Charge Carrier”) and was disposable demolition vehicles and remote controlled (through a cable). You can read more about them on good old wikipedia (here).

So although to quote the wikipedia article “Mostly, they failed to reach their target although the effect was considerable when they did.”, I think a scenario with them in it would add some tension to the game with some slow moving Goliaths working their way through the defensive positions whilst the infantry sections are trying to stop it with small arms fire.

Recently I found some files on Thingyverse (here) and printed out some Goliaths with and without trolleys and added some Peter Pig Germans and two Kettenrads. Happy how they turned out.

/Hope that was of some interest

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The International Force in Holstein 1700 – Part 2 The Danes

Matti, wrote this in the comments to the last blog post (see here), and it made me laugh.

I am fuming. For once I though I had come up with an original idea for a 6mm project, and even made my orders to Baccus, when you swoop in and do the same thing but better and more comprehensively! Curse you!

Jokes aside, they look great. There is a great book about the Danish campaign in Holstein and the naval situation associated leading to the landing at Humlebæk available at the Danish marine history page here called “King Frederik IV’s first war for South Jutland” http://marinehist.dk/?page_id=2845
It details the events and troop movements of the campaign in 1700 quite well, much better than any of the other sources on the campaign I’ve managed to find. While it’s only available in Danish, if I’ve been able to read it with my poor understanding of Swedish and the miracles of machine translation, I think anyone can manage it! The book also has listed in it the naval forces of both nations in the period, so if one would want to play out the naval battle that the Danish admiralty didn’t choose to take when the Swedish fleet crossed at the Eastern Sound.

Regards,
Matti

This is an excellent example of the kind of extremely useful interface that happens here on the blog and on twitter. Because the link in Matti’s e-mail is absolutely excellent. It gives the information I was looking for, namely the composition of the Danish Forces that was sent to Holstein. Thank you so much Matti.

Note that with regards to any discussions on units and bases the standard approach I have taken is that a battalion (400-600 men normally) is represented by 1 base of infantry, whilst a base of cavalry represents about 2-3 squadrons (200 to 300 men). This basing works well with the rule sets I am using Twilight of the Sun King, Polemos GNW and Maurice.

The book shows the regiments sent to Holstein (this from page 256-257 in the BIDRAG TIL DEN STORE NORDISKE KRIGS HISTORIE)

From the above we can derive that there were 18 battalions worth of infantry (assuming that the size of the battalions mentions for Prinz Georgs were about 100 men each). As for the cavalry I am not sure whether the full regiments were sent of not but for now that is my assumption, I assume these would be about 350 to 400 man strong, divied over 6 companies. That would make each cavalry regiment a unit of 2 bases.

So in summary 18 bases of infantry and 22 bases of Horse to do for the Danish side. For the potential Saxon support I will simply use the units I already have from my Kalisz and Klissow Projects. This project grew quickly! I do not think I can supply those from the lead mountain although I did paint a fair few Danes a few years back.

In addition Nick Dorrell has provided some useful links to the area of the Siege and the maps of the two camps:

With that in mind here are some links to maps of the rival camps, this is extremely useful in speculating how a potential field battle may have taken place.

http://www.digam.net/image.php?file=img/dokumente/3089/1.jpg&b=1200&h=auto

http://www.digam.net/image.php?file=img/dokumente/3090/1.jpg&b=1200&h=auto

http://www.digam.net/image.php?file=img/dokumente/3088/1.jpg&b=1200&h=auto

More Uniform Guides

I also realised that my sources (presented in the last blog) were somewhat patchy with regards to uniform information and flags, so I bought the following books from the Pike and Shot Society (link here):

  • Uniforms and Flags of the Armies of Hanover, Celle and Brunswick – 1670 – 1715 by Robert Hall
  • Flags and Uniforms of the Dutch Army 1685 – 1715 VOL I by Robert Hall, Iain Stanford and Yves Roumegoux
  • Flags and Uniforms of the Dutch Army 1685 – 1715 VOL I I by Robert Hall, Iain Stanford and Yves Roumegoux

Waiting to get these before I progress the miniatures too much as I think it may force me to do some re-paints, now what remains is the question of the uniform details of the Scheswig-Holstein-Gottorp regiments.

Foot

  • The Ducal Life Guard Regiment (unknown, Red with White Cuffs?)
  • Prince Christian-August (SORTED – covered in “The Great Northern War 1700-1721 – Colours and Uniforms – Part 2” by Höglund & Sallnäs)
  • Bautzen (SORTED – covered in “The Great Northern War 1700-1721 – Colours and Uniforms – Part 2” by Höglund & Sallnäs)
  • Von Barner (Hecules) (unknwn, blue with blue facings?)

Cavalry

  • Dragoon Guards (SORTED – covered in “The Great Northern War 1700-1721 – Colours and Uniforms – Part 2” by Höglund & Sallnäs )
  • Baudisson’s, sometimes called Bauditz’s, Dragoon Regiment (SORTED – covered in “The Great Northern War 1700-1721 – Colours and Uniforms – Part 2” by Höglund & Sallnäs, however says it was raied in 1702, another things to check)
  • Von Osten (SORTED – covered in “The Great Northern War 1700-1721 – Colours and Uniforms – Part 2” by Höglund & Sallnäs, however says it was raied in 1702, another things to check)

I did crack on with some infantry the other day, it is the old line of Baccus WSS units (the newer one are even better, but I think they paint up really good).

/ Hope that was of some interest, as always let me know if I am getting something wrong or if you have something useful like Matti to add (thanks again).

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The International Force in Holstein 1700, a new 6mm GNW project

See the source image

One of the first actions of the Great Northern War was the move by Danmark into Holstein-Gottorp, that was an ally and also bound dynastically to Sweden. Hedwig Eleonora of Holstein-Gottorp was the Queen Consort of Sweden, she was married to Charles X of Sweden from 1654 to 1660, then from his death 1660 served as Regent from to 1672, when her son Charles XI (of Scanian War fame) was an adult and again during the short time from Charles XI’s death to the time Charles XII assumed power at the age of 15. Later on she would be representing the Swedish Kingdom at home in Stockholm during Charles XII campaigns during the Great Northern War.

Hedwig Eleonora of Holstein-Gottorp, the de facto first lady of the Swedish Royal Court for 61 years, from 1654 her death in 1715. You can read more about her here.

The Danes laid Siege to the town of Tönning in 1700 but it was lifted following the deployment of the Swedish Army in front of Copenhagen that resulted in the Travendal Peace treaty in August 1700. Later in the war the town of Tönning would be besieged again but with a different outcome, but that is another (hi)story.

Tönning

During this time an International Force was sent to Holstein-Gottorp to aid the Duchy consisting of elements of the Schleswig-Holstein Gottorp Army with some Swedish Mercenary regiments, United Provinces (Dutch), the Hanoverians (Duchy of Luneburg-Celle and Duchy of Hanover-Calenburg) and a small Swedish Army under the Command of General Gyllenstierna.

It is this force I would like to do for my 6mm Great Northern War Collection, although no action really happened I would like to do a “what if” of a major field battle as this offers an interesting mix of units, commanders and also the possibility of potential support from the Saxons to the Danish side. I did a similar what-if with goof friend Nick Dorrell for the Battle of Horka 1708 at Joy of Six in 2018 (see more here).

So what are the details of this force? Well, Nick has done a tremendous job in presenting this information, see more here which is reproduced in a summary form below (with some additional information from my own notes and research). I will need to do some further research on the actual composition of the Danish force that invaded later.

Bases Needed for the Project

Basically I would need to do the following for this project:

Schleswig-Holstein Gottorp (9 infantry bases, 1 horse base, 3 dragoon bases)

Available Commanders – The Duke of Schleswig-Holstein Gottorp (Monarch)

9 infantry battalions – The Ducal Life Guard Regiment (2 btns), Christian-August (1 btn), Bautzen (1 btn) and Von Barner (Hecules, 1 btn), and then the Swedish Mercenary regiments: Wismar Garrison (1 btn), Stade Garrison (1 btn) and Wismar Governor (2 btns)

1 hourse regiment (not counting the small trabant unit) – Von Osten (1 base)

2 Dragoon Regiments – Dragoon Guards (1 base) and Baudisson Dragon Regiment (2 bases)

The Dutch (4 infantry bases, 3 horse bases, 2 dragoon bases)

Available Commanders – Anthoni Gunther, Prinze of von Holstein-Beck and Colonel Daniel van Dopf

4 Infantry battalions – Holstein-Beck’s Foot, Weller’s Foot, Keppel’s Foot and Capol’s Swiss Foot, each being represented by one 60 by 30mm base of infantry (as there were somewhere between 500 and 700 strong each). The Holstein-Beck Foot will be modelled with pikes based on Nick’s comments. I found the full names of the Colonels for 3 of these – Anthoni Gunther, Prinze of von Holstein-Beck, Hercule de Capol and Johan Rabo von Keppel.

3 Horse Regiments – Albermarle’s Carabiniers (Arnold Joust, Baron van Keppel, 1st Earl of Albermarle), Ostfriesland’s (Colonel Fredric Ulrich, Graaf von Oost- Friesland) and Aughrim’s Horse (Colonel Frederik Christian von Reede – Baron Aughrim). I normal model every 2 squadrons per base, in this case there were 3 squadrons for Albermarle and 1 squadon for the others. I will simplify this to three bases of each – it is a compromise I can live with.

1 Dragoon Regiments, – Colonel Daniel Wolf van Dopf’s Dragoons were also part of the force and these will be represented by 2 bases.

Duchy of Luneburg-Celle (7 infantry bases, 2 horse bases, 4 bases of Dragoons)

Available Commanders: Duke George William (Monarch) and General-Feldzeugmeister Marquis de Boisdavid

7 infantry battalions – Oberst La Motte (2 btns), Generalmajor de Luc (2 btns) and the rest with 1 battalion each for Generalleutnant Graf Detlef von Rantzau, Oberst Mally de Charles and Generalmajor Barthold Hartwig von Bernstorffs.

2 horse regiments (1 base each) – General-Feldzeugmeister Marquis de Boisdavid and Brigadier de la Croix de Frechapple.

2 Dragoon regiments (2 bases each) – Oberst von Villers and Reichsgraf Friedrich Johann von Bothmer

Duchy of Hanover-Calenburg (5 infantry bases, 7 horse bases)

Available Commanders: Duke Georg Ludwig (Monarch) and Generalleutnant von Sommerfeld

5 infantry battalions – Garde zu Fuß (Generalleutnant von Sommerfeld, 2 bases), Generalmajor St. Pol des Estanges, Generalmajor d’Herbeville and Oberst von Schlegel.#

4 horse regiments (2 base each except for Garde du Corps with 1 base) – Oberst Ernst Bogislaw von Podewils, Generalmajor von Voigt, Generalmajor Graf de Noyelles and Generalleutnant Christian Ludwig von Wyhe (Garde du Corps).

Sweden (12 infantry bases, 9 bases of “Galloping Horse”)

Available Commander – General Nils Carlsson Gyllenstierna and (TBD – need to review which Senior commanders would have been with these regiments during this time).

12 infantry battalions (or 10) – Skaraborgs (2 btns), Södermanlands (2 btns) , Kronobergs (2 btns) , Östgöta (2 btns) and Riksänkedrottningens Life regiment in Pommern (2 btns) and maybe Jönköpings (2 btn).

Horse and Dragoon (3 bases Galloping Horse each) – Pommerska Horse, Bremiska Horse and Bremiska Dragoons.

Summary 37 infantry bases, 13 horses, 9 Galloping Horse, 9 Dragoon bases = 888 infantry and 279 cavalry

Painting Guides

As for painting guides, I have consulted the following materials (and will improvise where I do not know):

Schleswig-Holstein Gottorp – link here / and “Der Deutsche Staaten I” by Claus-Peter Golberg

The Dutch – “Dutch Army of William III” C.A Sapherson

Duchy of Luneburg-Celle – “Der Deutsche Staaten II” by Claus-Peter Golberg

Duchy of Hanover-Calenburg – “Der Deutsche Staaten II” by Claus-Peter Golberg

Sweden – “The Great Northern War 1700-1721 – Colours and Uniforms” by Höglund & Sallnäs

A little bit of Progress

Good news is that I did two sessions this week painting about half the cavalry I need. I may be able to re-use some of the Swedish units from other projects. You may note that these are the older version of the WSS range from Baccus, but to be honest I think they paint up really good (I have to admit to having a little bit of a lead mountain so this atual project will not require any additional expense).

If you are interested in this or know more about the smaller states I am more than interested to hear more through the comments.

/ Hope that was of some interest, will keep you updated on progress.

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Progress on the Sweden 1943 Project and a new Wargames Podcast

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The mighty Stridsvagn m/42

One of my favourite looking tanks is the Swedish m/42 tank, a domestic tank that was finalised in 1943 and plausable to take some kind of place in a 1943 what-if invasion of Sweden. It did initially have a lot of issues as was not very reliable and I found an interesting article here. I did have one of these in 15mm before but got another two from Shapeways some time ago – I was waiting for an alternative source but I think these are great even if they take you back about £19 each.

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An armoured Truck – Pbil m/31

The second one is a Paul Edwards special (who runs the excellent Sabotag3d company – https://www.sabotag3d.com/). I showed Paul a picture of one and of them and off he went and designed one for me and printed out a fair few, and I have had them lying around for about a year – it was time to put some paint on them. More about this vehicle here.

See the source image
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First one done, note the upgraded 1942 version had a 20mm cannon.
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Countryside touring in Dalarna 1943.
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I made Six because I had Six
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…and a few MC riders as escort
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And a few Swedish Engineering Types

That was all, see you in Dalarna in 1943!

Sorry one more thing, there is a new Podcast that is worth giving a listen and a follow. You may already be familiar with the excellent Yarkshire Gamer blog, Ken has decided to share not just his smooth voice but his passion in Audio, focusing in the grand spectacle stuff, big gaming.

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Part 1 – Episode 1 – World War Roses

Part 2 – Legendary Wargames

Go and try it out.

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Me, a Caesar Award Nominee?

To my surprise and delight I found out last week that the blog has been nominated for Best Wargame Blog 2021 in the Caesar Awards that is held by the good folks at Little Wars TV. I am really grateful for the people who nominated Rollaone.com and having checked out the competition – two blogs that are stalwarts in the blogging world and blogs I enjoy myself – I am honoured to be in such a nice company. You should check them out.

Palousewargaming Journal

Analogues Hobbies Painting Challenge

I started Rollaone.com as a thank you to all the contents that is being provided by so many people out there that has helped me over the years in getting inspired, learning techniques, finding out more about various periods and frankly getting a little bit of an escape from it all.

The blog is still alive an active although I find that the microblogging, as Henry Hyde calls it, I am doing on Twitter is taking a bigger part and I am yet to find the perfect balance. Surprisingly the whole lockdown thing has on paper given me more time to do stuff , but has not really put me in the most inspirational mood. Things like this really makes me happy.

Go and check it out, you can only vote for the blog award or any others if you are a Little Wars patreon and/or one of the judges.

But there is one category you can vote for and that is the best Wargaming Youtube Channel 2021 (in the link here https://www.caesarawards.com/). Go and have a look, they are all great channels and whilst you are checking them out go and enjoy some time with Little Wars TV – an outstanding source of inspiration and great wargaming. For me they are all winners but I think that the solid contributions from Alex on the Storm of Steel Wargaming really hits the mark for me – giving a wide variety of content from historical accounts to playthrough videos of various rulesets – it is not slick and rehearsed, but brilliant and from the heart and delivers Wargaming inspiration in spades.

/ All the very best

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Some Command Bases for my 6mm GNW stuff

I really like some of the classic art depicting the Great Northern War era (1700-1721), not just the big battle scenes but also some of the powerful character portraits. Most of the most famous ones were done long after the events during the so called national romantic era in the late 19th century. I am doing to quickly share a few of these and its purpose will become clearer as we progress.

Magnus Stenbock at the Battle of Helsinborg 1710

The first one is the painting showing Magnus Stenbock at the Battle of Helsingborg in 1710. A decisive victory over the Danes and stopped Denmark’s final military effort to regain the southern provinces of Scania that had been bitterly fought over since the 1650ies. The painting is by Gustaf Olof Cederström  (1845-1933) and shows Stenbock raising his hat and a young drummer boy looking up to him – Sweden’s faith was in the balance after the disaster at Poltava 1709. My father had the picture in a book at home and told a very young boy about the newly raised army rising up to the task and winning on that glorious day. The accolades, not just from the Swedish people, from around Europe including the Great Duke of Marlborough himself. Stenbock was appointed Field Marshal after the victory. It is a fantastic painting.

A beautiful painting, note the clogs (at least as tradition has it) and the varied uniforms in the quickly raised and badly equipped Swedish Army.

Charles XII of Sweden and Ivan Mazepa after the Battle of Poltava

The next painting is another Cederström and shows Charles sitting down at the Dneiper river with the Cossack Ivan Mazepa who had aided the Swedes during the lead up to Poltava. Maybe Ivan is telling him to hurry up before the Russian comes and take him prisoner. The disaster at Poltava in 1709 was the worst day in Swedish military history.

File:Mazepa2.JPG
Alles ist verloren!

Charles XII at horse

And finally and perhaps my favourite Charles XII on a horse by David von Krafft (1655-1724) who was a Swedish court painter. The painting shows the king in his simple blue uniform like his soldier and without any embellishments.

See the source image
I envisage Charles XII looking something like this at the Battle of Battle of Holowczyn 1708. It was according to himself his favourite battle.

So why am I sharing these pictures with you? Well before Christmas I commissioned a few 6mm miniatures to enable be to do some Command bases inspired by these painting as the arrived today and I put some paint on them. I hope you like them.

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All based on a Penny!

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And the commission was with Combat Miniatures 6mm, you can find them on facebook @6mmcombatminiatures. I am really happy with the miniatures and the service.

/ Hope that was of some interest.